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The Everest Test

Written by Ian Ditchburn.

The Everest Test was to take place on a plateau next to Everest Base Camp at 5200m above sea level. The idea was to haul 30 players, three umpires, 10 supporters, an artificial wicket and all the cricket kit needed up to the plateau to play a game of Twenty20. We were also raising money for a couple of charities through sponsorship.

The expedition had snowballed in size and they needed a medical team. Although I didn’t have any formal expedition qualifications I’d taken myself to Virginia earlier in the year to do an ATLS course (the difference in cost compared to the UK course paid for the flight) and at medical school I’d taken part in an altitude research expedition to Bolivia (www.apex-altitude.com). After a couple of phone interviews I was in.

 

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From Cornwall to Cape Town

Written by Sebastian Wallace, Richard Wain-Hobson and Daniel Nuth.

road-from-kenyaIn October 2012 three junior doctors set off with the aim of driving Tess, their 1992 Land Rover Defender, from Cornwall, their home and place of work, to Cape Town.

At the time of writing, they were in their 28th country and 19,973rd mile, having traversed Europe, negotiated the Mediterranean by way of a ferry from Turkey to Egypt, tracked up the Nile through the Sudan into Ethiopia, and followed the great rift valley south from Somalia.

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Top five eccentric medical inventors

Written by Ben Chandler.

Some of the greatest advances in medicine were spearheaded by some of the most eccentric characters. Ben Chandler reviews his top five eccentric medrepreneurs.

HORACE WELLS (1815-1848)

Wells was an American dentist with a dislike for inflicting pain on his patients. His flash of genius occurred at a travelling show where he observed an audience member injure their leg while under the influence of laughing gas (nitrous oxide). Wells noted that the person experienced no pain and realised that this gas might also bring to an end the pain of dental surgery. In his first experiment he took the gas himself for his own tooth extraction and subsequently used it on a number of patients.

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How to run a quality improvement project

Written by Rob Bethune.

Effecting change in the NHS as a junior doctor can be a daunting experience. With limited power, influence and time it can seem an almost impossible task.

Yet, as a junior doctor we get a unique insight into how we can improve patient care. In this article The Network’s Rob Bethune offers a few helpful suggestions that can help facilitate change.

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The Francis Report

Written by Ashley McKimm.

A BRIEFING FOR JUNIOR DOCTORS

Described as the worst UK hospital scandal of recent years, up to 1,200 patients were estimated to have died as a result of poor care at Stafford hospital.

The £13 million Francis inquiry concluded this month and made 290 recommendations which will impact everyone working in healthcare. Here’s our briefing on what it means for junior doctors.

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