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From Cornwall to Cape Town

Written by Sebastian Wallace, Richard Wain-Hobson and Daniel Nuth. Posted in Experiences

road-from-kenyaIn October 2012 three junior doctors set off with the aim of driving Tess, their 1992 Land Rover Defender, from Cornwall, their home and place of work, to Cape Town.

At the time of writing, they were in their 28th country and 19,973rd mile, having traversed Europe, negotiated the Mediterranean by way of a ferry from Turkey to Egypt, tracked up the Nile through the Sudan into Ethiopia, and followed the great rift valley south from Somalia.

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Top five eccentric medical inventors

Written by Ben Chandler. Posted in Experiences

Some of the greatest advances in medicine were spearheaded by some of the most eccentric characters. Ben Chandler reviews his top five eccentric medrepreneurs.

HORACE WELLS (1815-1848)

Wells was an American dentist with a dislike for inflicting pain on his patients. His flash of genius occurred at a travelling show where he observed an audience member injure their leg while under the influence of laughing gas (nitrous oxide). Wells noted that the person experienced no pain and realised that this gas might also bring to an end the pain of dental surgery. In his first experiment he took the gas himself for his own tooth extraction and subsequently used it on a number of patients.

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How to run a quality improvement project

Written by Rob Bethune. Posted in Experiences

Effecting change in the NHS as a junior doctor can be a daunting experience. With limited power, influence and time it can seem an almost impossible task.

Yet, as a junior doctor we get a unique insight into how we can improve patient care. In this article The Network’s Rob Bethune offers a few helpful suggestions that can help facilitate change.

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The Francis Report

Written by Ashley McKimm. Posted in Experiences

A BRIEFING FOR JUNIOR DOCTORS

Described as the worst UK hospital scandal of recent years, up to 1,200 patients were estimated to have died as a result of poor care at Stafford hospital.

The £13 million Francis inquiry concluded this month and made 290 recommendations which will impact everyone working in healthcare. Here’s our briefing on what it means for junior doctors.

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Bridge of Death - Suicides at the Golden Gate

Written by Denise Oliveri. Posted in Experiences

golden-gate-bridgeSan Franciso's Golden Gate Bridge is not only known as the most photographed structure in the USA but also for it's more intriguing title as the most popular site for suicide jumps in the world. Over 1,200 people have travelled to this location to take their own lives since the bridge opened in 1937. In fact, the rate of suicide is rising and, as Denise Oliveri reports, officials are struggling to stop the frenzy.

The drop from the Golden Gate Bridge is approximately 260 feet. It takes a quick four seconds to drop from the deck of the bridge to the waters below, and at a speed of 75 mph it is almost always an instant death. With such a fast impact many jumpers are convinced they won't feel a thing, making the idea of suicide more tolerable at this location.

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