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End of life for the Liverpool Care Pathway?

Written by Laura James. Posted in Experiences

ituAfter almost a year of negative publicity and little in the press to defend its good intentions, the Liverpool Care Pathway is now gradually being phased out.

This model of care for patients in their last hours or days of life was analysed by a government commissioned review. It concluded that although the pathway itself is a model of good practice, it has not been applied properly in too many cases1.

While some members of the public may be cheering its departure, it has left many questions for health care professionals, in particular, what went wrong, and what next? JuniorDr's Laura James attempts to provide the answers.

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Strange medical products from animals

Written by Ben Chandler. Posted in Experiences

Would you ever consider injecting a product taken from a pig’s intestine into a patient then reversing its effects with a syringe full of fish sperm? Believe it or not these are just some of the wacky products we use in everyday medicine. Ben Chandler takes a trip to the pharmaceutical zoo, to uncover some of the strangest uses of animal parts he can find. Add a comment

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Animals in training

Written by Ben Chandler. Posted in Experiences

Scientific advisor to the government, The Royal Society, claim that virtually every medical achievement in the 20th century relied on the use of animals in some way. Today about 50-100 million vertebrate animals continue to be used for medical experimentation each year.

JuniorDr’s Ben Chandler looks at the current use of animals in clinical treatment and their role in medical training.

 

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Managing end of life care

Written by Laura James. Posted in Experiences

Aside from the controversy surrounding the Liverpool Care Pathway, managing end of life care can be a difficult process for junior doctors.

JuniorDr’s Laura James asks Dr Vincent Crosby, palliative medicine consultant at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, for his advice.

 

 

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The Everest Test

Written by Ian Ditchburn. Posted in Experiences

The Everest Test was to take place on a plateau next to Everest Base Camp at 5200m above sea level. The idea was to haul 30 players, three umpires, 10 supporters, an artificial wicket and all the cricket kit needed up to the plateau to play a game of Twenty20. We were also raising money for a couple of charities through sponsorship.

The expedition had snowballed in size and they needed a medical team. Although I didn’t have any formal expedition qualifications I’d taken myself to Virginia earlier in the year to do an ATLS course (the difference in cost compared to the UK course paid for the flight) and at medical school I’d taken part in an altitude research expedition to Bolivia (www.apex-altitude.com). After a couple of phone interviews I was in.

 

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