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So you want to be a microbiologist?

Written by Yasmin Akram. Posted in Careers

microbiologyMicrobiology is the study of bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal infections and microbiologists are the key connections between the laboratory and the patient. They remain clinically involved with a range of different patients and have a vital role to play in advising on their management.

A microbiologists work is concerned with diagnosing, investigating and managing infectious diseases in both the hospital and community setting and in protecting people at risk against these infections. It also involves the management and control of outbreaks and public health responsibilities and monitoring patterns of infectious diseases locally.

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Oral and maxillofacial surgery

Written by KARL PAYNE, RORY O’CONNOR, NABEELA AHMED. Posted in Careers

skullsWhat do maxillofacial surgeons actually do?

It may sound like a cliché, but think of the face and ask what a maxillofacial surgeon can't do! It isn't only teeth and maxillofacial surgeons aren't all just dentists (although yes, you do need a medical and dental degree to start speciality training).

As a junior trainee you will spend your on-call shift seeing facial trauma. That includes suspected fractures, soft tissue injuries and dento-facial infection. Maxillofacial surgery is one of the few specialities where you are able to undertake a wide array of soft tissue work in A&E - and given the number of soft tissue injuries that present via A&E, a significant number of these will be referred to maxillofacial surgery. Being on-call is not just about admitting and clerking patients, you actually get to treat them too unlike many specialties.

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Flying doctors down under

Written by JuniorDr. Posted in Working overseas

An overseas OOPE in aeromedical retrieval

When Dr Aarjan Snoek wanted to develop his skills leading a multidisciplinary team in the management of critically ill patients he realised there could be no more fun way than by becoming a flying doctor down under. Now back in the UK he tells us how taking to the air has helped him develop some unique skills.

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New Zealand

Written by JuniorDr. Posted in Working overseas

new-zealand-workingThe South Island of New Zealand is an adventurer’s playground showcasing the best that nature has to offer, with towering Alps, majestic fjords and sounds, and rugged coastlines merging into sweeping plains.

Where else in the world would you find an area so blessed with unique wildlife, world class ski fields, renowned vineyards, spectacular scenery offered by no less than 10 national parks, and some of the most down-to-earth people you’re ever likely to meet?

 

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Working Overseas - British Columbia

Written by Dr. Isabelle Hughan. Posted in Working overseas

british-columbiaWhether it's Australia, New Zealand or Canada there are plenty of options for doctors wanting to escape the UK. We've asked those who have made the move to tell us about their favourite overseas locations and their advice on making the transition.

Born in England, I went to school and did my medical training in London. Two years ago, my husband and I were looking to leave London when he spotted an advert. I had never been to British Columbia but had enjoyed Seattle, so we attended a Health Match meeting in London. They explained the requirements and since then have facilitated our move with ease. Add a comment